Advanced Oxidation Processes

Advanced Oxidation Processes

The use of an Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) is an ideal approach to treat new kinds of persistent water contaminants.  AOP is the combination of two or more processes to generate or increase the number of hydroxyl radicals (OH radicals). The OH radicals contribute to the oxidation of undesirable substances and have a considerably higher oxidation potential compared to other oxidants.

Once hydroxyl radicals have formed in water, they immediately react to virtually all existing oxidizable substances. The high degradation performance and the quick reaction kinetics of this process are the formula for success when it comes to eliminating numerous persistent substances.

 

Comparison of oxidants

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Determine your most efficient AOP process

In theory, there are 20 possible methods to create hydroxyl radicals. In practice, there are two processes that are most commonly used:

Ozone + Hydrogen Peroxide

Ozone + Hydrogen Peroxide

In the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ozone (O3) reacts with the anion of the hydrogen peroxide (HO2-) and creates hydroxyl radicals. This reaction is quicker and more effective than the reaction of ozone alone in water. 

UV Light + Hydrogen Peroxide

UV Light + Hydrogen Peroxide

In this process, the UV light is absorbed by the hydrogen peroxide dissolved in the water. In theory, this process leads to the formation of two OH radicals, made from one H2O2 molecule.

Determine the right solution for your problem

WEDECO can help you to find the right solution before you make any long-term commitment. You benefit from our many years of experience in AOP and its core components. WEDECO AOP solutions involve a combination of technologies that  include ozone oxidation, ultraviolet light, and hydrogen peroxide – usually as O3/H2O2, UV/H2O2, or all three agents together.

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Why Advanced Oxidation Processes?
Why Advanced Oxidation Processes?

Water utilities are reporting a worldwide rising trend in the presence of micropollutants in water resources. Traces of organic / inorganic pollutants like NDMA, MTBE, 1,4-Dioxane, EDC’s, etc. are often found in wastewater, ground water, and surface water.

The reasons for the increasing degree of contamination are often due to industrialization, intensive agriculture practices, as well as all-round medical provisions for humans. Once these micropollutants enter the human food chain via drinking water, there is a long term risk to public health - even to human or animal genetic material. Traditional treatment methods are no longer sufficient to guarantee complete removal of these contaminants.

Due to climate and demographic changes, many water utilities are expecting further pollution of drinking water resources in the near future.  As a consequence, there is a higher risk of water scarcity and an increasing demand for direct or indirect wastewater reuse, resulting in the need for higher levels of treatment.